IHC journals cancelled

After broad consultation, the California Digital Library (CDL) has cancelled the systemwide license to the Informa Healthcare (IHC) journals. According to the CDLINFO News, three important principles were the basis for this decision: "the reality of UC library budgets and a mandate to reduce consortial spending, the use of clear value metrics to inform decisions of fiscal responsibility, and the need for sustainable pricing in the scholarly publishing marketplace."

Additional information is available on CDL's Challenges to Licensing page.

Feb 02, 2011 | Categories: UC Policies | mphillip

eScholarship and undergrads

eScholarship will extend its robust repository and publishing services platform to include UC undergraduate work, effective immediately. The CDL and UC Libraries recognize the clear and pressing need for the establishment of a service for the dissemination of substantial undergraduate research and publications, which are an increasingly prevalent outcome of the undergraduate education at the University of California. eScholarship already serves the repository and open access publishing needs of UC faculty and graduate students by providing access to nearly 40,000 research publications and 37 UC-affiliated open access journals representing over 275 academic units. Our undergraduate research services will include support for faculty-sponsored undergraduate journals, capstone projects, prizewinning papers, etc. We look forward to working with the campuses to spread the word about this new service. For any inquiries or questions, please contact Catherine Mitchell, Director of Publishing Services, California Digital Library (catherine.mitchell@ucop.edu)

Jan 26, 2011 | Categories: Initiatives | mphillip

BRII anniversary

January 21, 2011: The Berkeley Research Impact Initiative (BRII) celebrates its three year anniversary today. BRII supports faculty members, post-docs, and graduate students who want to make their journal articles free to all readers immediately upon publication. Over the last three years, BRII has approved more than 100 requests thus increasing the amount of Berkeley research that is open access. Through this program, BRII has also encouraged faculty to manage their copyright and has supported those researchers who wish to make their findings more widely available but who may not have access to alternative grant or departmental funding sources. Those benefiting from BRII come from a wide range of disciplines including environmental sciences, public health, engineering, energy and resources, life sciences, education and psychology. For more information on BRII along with instructions on how to apply for funding for your open access journal article go to the BRII website.

Jan 20, 2011 | Categories: Initiatives | mphillip

Willinsky on OA - Nov 4

International Open Access Week continues with a talk by John Willinsky on Open Access and other Intellectual Properties of Learning

Thursday, November 4
3:30-5:00pm
Education/Psychology Library

In this talk, Professor John Willinsky will provide a brief update on current developments in open access. He will sketch out a host of reasons (historical, philosophical, economic, and legal) why some form of open access on a global basis is an entirely reasonable expectation, full of educational and intellectual advantages.

John Willinsky is the Khosla Family Professor of Education at Stanford University and director of the Public Knowledge Project. Much of his published work, as well as PKP's journal and conference management software, is freely available through the project's website.

  • Students, researchers, faculty and the public are invited to attend.
  • Come early and get a free t-shirt (a limited number of open access t-shirts will be distributed)
  • Light refreshments will be served.
Oct 28, 2010 | Categories: Events | mphillip

Open Access Week at UCB

Open Access Week is a global event promoting Open Access as the new norm in scholarship and research. Several Berkeley events are planned for OA week and beyond.


Publish Smart, Maximize Impact

Do you have an article you want to publish? Are you trying to decide where to place it? This workshop will examine how journals are ranked for impact (including some of the controversies about ranking systems), and your rights as an author. Are you confused about copyright? Do you want to be able to post copies of your article on your own website? Do you know whether you'll be able to? We will discuss Berkeley funding to support open access publishing, and the movement in academia to make information more accessible. Not only is open access a social good, it can also be good for you as an author!

Three sessions will be offered, each with a slightly different focus:

Social Sciences
Wednesday, October 20
4:00-5:30pm
251 Doe Library

Humanities & Area Studies
Thursday, October 28
2:00 - 3:30pm
251 Doe Library

Sciences
Friday, October 29
12 noon - 1:30pm
Biosciences Library Seminar Room


Action for Open Access

The Students for Free Culture sponsor this webcast with Nick Shockey of the Right to Research Coalition, a national organization that believes no student should be denied access to research they need because their institution cannot afford the often high cost of access.

Thursday, October 21
4:00pm - 5:30pm
Bioscience Library Seminar Room


Open Access Goes to Washington

In July 2010, a Congressional Hearing held to inform legislators primed to consider the Federal Research Public Access Act (or FRPAA) offered a unique opportunity for lawmakers to hear the testimonies of 10 witnesses as they spoke to the important implications of expanding public access to the results of federally funded scientific research.  Catherine Nancarrow was a witness at this Hearing. She will summarize the points she made and describe the reactions of the Congressional panel who now, better informed, will be considering the issues in advance of a vote.

Friday, October 22
12 noon - 1:30pm
Bioscience Library Seminar Room


Open Access and other Intellectual Properties of Learning

In this talk, Professor John Willinsky will provide a brief update on current developments in open access. He will sketch out a host of reasons (historical, philosophical, economic, and legal) why some form of open access on a global basis is an entirely reasonable expectation, full of educational and intellectual advantages.

John Willinsky is the Khosla Family Professor of Education at Stanford University and director of the Public Knowledge Project. Much of his published work, as well as PKP's journal and conference management software, is freely available through the project's website.

Thursday, November 4
3:30-5:00pm
Education/Psychology Library

Oct 12, 2010 | Categories: Events | mphillip

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