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Cool Web of Science Tools: find the top authors and journals on your topic

Web of Science (WoS) is a great multi-disciplinary tool for finding citations on your topic, and for cited reference searching. But WoS has many other features you may not know about. Did you know you can find the top authors are who are publishing on a topic? Or, that you can find the journals with the most articles on your topic? Here's how:

Start by searching on a topic of interest in Web of Science:

On the search results page, click the Analyze Results link:

To find the journals with the most articles on your topic, select Source Titles in the Rank the records by this field: box. You can show the top 10-500 results, and set the minimum number of records a selection must have to appear in your list. In the image below, we will see the top 25 journal titles, and each must have at least 10 articles from the search:

After clicking Analyze, here are the results:

In this example, there are an additional 27 Source Titles with at least 25 articles.

You now have the option to view the results of any journal titles you select, download the results, or go back and re-analyze. You can then do the same search, choosing Author instead of Source Title, to get a list of the top publishing authors in this topic.

Aug 08, 2013 | Categories: Scholarly Communication, Tips and Updates | msholinb

San Francisco Declaration on Research Assessment: Time to Dump Impact Factor

ScienceInsider has an interesting article about the San Francisco Declaration on Research Assessment (DORA) posted online last week. The declaration recommends that institutions and agencies "eliminate the use of journal-based metrics, such as Journal Impact Factors, in funding, appointment, and promotion considerations." The declaration also has specific recommendations for funding agencies, institutions, publishers, organizations that supply metrics, and researchers.

Here is the ScienceInsider article: In 'Insurrection,' Scientists, Editors Call for Abandoning Journal Impact Factors.

Also take a look at the response published in eLife: "It is time for the research community to rethink how the outputs of scientific research are evaluated... ."

Based on a recent post in the UCB Science & Engineering Libraries News blog.

May 20, 2013 | Categories: Scholarly Communication | msholinb

Summer hours have begun: Mon-Fri 10am-5pm

Have a great summer! And, please feel free to come visit us during our summer hours, Monday-Friday 10am - 5 pm.

Our Reference Desk is open M-F, 2-4 pm.

May 20, 2013 | Categories: News | msholinb

Embase Classic (1947-1973 citations) Now Available at UCB

We are happy to announce that the library now provides access to Embase Classic, consisting of over 1.8 million older (1947-1973; a small number of pre-1947 citations are also included) citations in Embase. All Embase searches will automatically include these older citations, as well as the 1974 to present citations, unless you specifically exclude them, which can be done in 2 ways:

  • Adding a date range limit to your search;
  • UN-checking "Embase Classic" on the advanced search screen

 

Embase, including Embase Classic, is a primary resources for evidence-based medical research. Coverage is especially strong in drug, pharmaceutical, and toxicological research including economic evaluations. More details on Embase Classic: http://www.elsevier.com/bibliographic-databases/embase-classic.

As always to locate full-text articles, please click on the UC-eLinks icon.

If you have any questions, please let us know!

May 16, 2013 | Categories: New Resources | msholinb

Available on a trial basis: PolicyMap

PolicyMap is an online data and mapping tool with applications for students and faculty. Useful for folks in sociology, urban studies, community and economic development, public administration, public health, policy and political science, education, business (real estate and marketing), and geography, among others.

Leverage over 15,000 US data indicators in PolicyMap to perform demographic and socioeconomic analysis, from a neighborhood census block up to a national level, as well as by creating custom regions, for their research and studies. The indicators are related to demographics, neighborhood conditions, real estate markets, money and income, jobs and economy, education, crime, health, and more. PolicyMap data can be presented as maps, tables, charts and reports that can be incorporated into papers, presentations, blogs and websites. In addition, students can upload unlimited amounts of their own address-based data for use in PolicyMap, and can share these maps with others.

Trial runs through mid-May. Feedback appreciated!

Apr 26, 2013 | Categories: New Resources | msholinb

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