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New Releases Wednesday: Cornelius L. Hopper: A Career in Medicine and Higher Education Administration

Photo of Dr. Cornelius Hopper, 1978 by Kirwan Berkeley

Cornelius L. Hopper: A Career in Medicine and Higher Education Administration: University of Wisconsin, 1967-1971, Tuskegee Institute, 1971-1979; University of California, 1979-1999

Cornelius L. Hopper. M.D. is the Emeritus Vice President for Health Affairs for the University of California System. Born in Oklahoma, Dr. Hopper received his AB and MD degrees, respectively, from Ohio University in Athens, Ohio, and the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine. He served as a Battalion Surgeon in the Marines from 1961 to 1963. Later, Dr. Hopper trained in Internal Medicine at Marquette University and subsequently Neurology at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, where he remained on the Neurology faculty until 1971. In 1971 Dr. Hopper accepted the directorship of the John A. Andrew Memorial Hospital at Tuskegee Institute in Alabama and an appointment as the Institute's Vice President for Health Affairs. In 1979 Dr. Hopper was recruited to the University of California System as Special Assistant for Health Affairs to the University's President and in 1983 was promoted to Vice President. For twenty years, until his retirement in 2000, he served as the senior administrative officer for the nation's largest university health sciences system, encompassing fourteen health professions schools on six campuses, an enrollment of thirteen thousand students, and a budget of over $3 billion. Dr. Hopper and his wife Barbara have been married for over 50 years, and have three children. His oral history transcript is now available online.

Apr 27, 2016 | Categories: OHC Articles | ddunham

New Releases Wednesday: Jennifer Colliau: A Bartender's Perspective on West Coast Cocktail Culture

Jennifer Colliau: A Bartender's Perspective on West Coast Cocktail Culture

Jennifer Colliau is a small business owner, Beverage Director, and veteran bartender. She was born and raised in Oakland, California. She graduated from Oakland Tech High School before attending the University of Southern California for Theater. She got her start bartending in Los Angeles, California at the Irish Times, a pub, while pursuing a career in acting. She ultimately decided to forgo that career path and moved back to the Bay Area to attend trade school and California College of the Arts for woodworking. She began working at Bucci's in Emeryville, California, where she began her career in the bar industry. She discusses her early childhood and education, time in Los Angeles, return to the Bay Area, developing a passion for cocktails and the bar industry, furniture making, the Bay Area bar community, working with Thad Vogler and Erik Adkins at the Slanted Door, the rise of contemporary cocktail culture, starting Small Hand Foods, being a women in the bar industry, and what sets the Bay Area apart from other places.

This West Coast Cocktail Project oral history transcript is now available online.

Apr 13, 2016 | Categories: OHC Articles | ddunham

New Releases Wednesday: Robert Gibson: A Pioneering Career in Pharmacy at UCSF, 1950s-2000s

Photo of Robert Gibson

Robert Gibson: A Pioneering Career in Pharmacy at UCSF, 1950s-2000s

Robert Gibson was born in Tacoma, Washington. He served in the US Army during World War II. In 1958 he was the first African American to receive a Pharm.D. from the University of California, San Francisco. He then joined the faculty at UCSF where over the next 50 years he served in many capacities, including Associate Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs, Associate Dean for Professional Affairs in the School of Pharmacy, and as Director of the Pharmaceutical Technology Laboratory. In 2000 he was elected president of the American Pharmaceutical Association, and in 2006 he received the Remington Honor Medal.

Mar 30, 2016 | Categories: OHC Articles | ddunham

New Releases Wednesday: Jorg Rupf: A Distiller's Perspective on Contemporary Cocktail Culture

Jörg Rupf: A Distiller's Perspective on Contemporary Cocktail Culture

Jörg Rupf is an Alsatian-born distiller who founded St. George Spirits in 1982. Rupf was raised in Freiburg and Lake Constance, Germany. After earning a PhD in law, he became a court system judge and later, worked for both the Ministry of Internal Affairs and Ministry of Culture. He moved to Berkeley, CA in the mid-1970s to pursue post-doctoral research on legal studies and the arts at the University of California, Berkeley. He left the legal field and began distilling eau de vie in the early 1980s (though he had been doing this already for most of his life). He became America?s first artisanal distiller when he opened St. George Spirits in 1982, paving the way for future generations like Lance Winters. In this interview, Rupf discusses his early life in Germany, his love for music and the violin, experience working in the legal field, decision to leave law and start distilling, agriculture in the Bay Area, early days of sourcing, production, distribution, and marketing, legal challenges, bringing on new staff, learning from others, the role the wine industry played in the 1980s and 90s, expanding operations, receiving accolades and recognition by the spirits industry, interest in agave-based spirits, handing over St. George Spirits to Lance Winters in 2010, and life after retirement.

This oral history is part of our West Coast Cocktails Oral History Project.

Mar 23, 2016 | Categories: OHC Articles | ddunham

New Releases Wednesday: California Supreme Court Justice Cruz Reynoso

Justice Cruz Reynoso: California Supreme Court Justice, Professor of Law, Vice-Chair United States Commission on Human Rights, and 2000 Presidential Medal of Freedom Recipient

Cruz Reynoso was born in Brea, California. He attended Fullerton College and Pamona College, and served two years (1953-1955) in the United States Army. In 1958 he received his Bachelor of Law degree from UC Berkeley. He has been a professor of law at the University of New Mexico, UCLA, and UC Davis. From 1981 to 1986, he served on the California Supreme Court, and from 1993 to 2004 he was vice-chairman of the United States Commission on Civil Rights. In 2000, Justice Reynoso was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

This interview was undertaken in partnership and under the auspices of the California State Archives, State Government Oral History Program. It is posted here courtesy of the California State Archives, and no part of the manuscript may be quoted for publication without the written permission of the California State Archivist. Requests for permission to quote for publication should be addressed to The California State Archives, 1020 O Street, Sacramento, California, 95814.

Mar 23, 2016 | Categories: OHC Articles | ddunham

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